Southern African Young Scientists Summer Program: Apply!

Deadline: September 1, 2013

Applications are now invited for the Southern African Young Scientists Summer Program (SA-YSSP). This is a new three-month program for talented young researchers to work with scientists from South Africa and IIASA, which will take place from 24 November 2013 to 22 February 2014. Participants will carry out collaborative research projects at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa. The projects will relate both to their doctoral studies and to IIASA research that uses systems analysis methods to address major societal problems.

Each young scientist will work with a collaborating team of advanced researchers, including one researcher from South Africa and the other from IIASA or IIASA’s research network. South African advisors will be resident for 3-4 weeks, while IIASA advisors will be in attendance for 1-2 weeks. When advisors are off-site, they are connected with the young scientists via videoconferencing on a regular basis.

SA-YSSP 2013-14 research themes

  • Cluster 1: Risk and Governance
  • Cluster 2: Energy and Climate Systems
  • Cluster 3: Ecosystems and Water
  • Cluster 4: Population, Health and Aging

Eligibility

  • PhD students from South Africa, sub-Saharan African countries, and other IIASA member countries are invited to

Conditions of participation

  • Participants are expected to be resident at the University of the Free State for the SA-YSSP’s entire 3-month period and to engage in the necessary preparations and follow-up activities.
  • With approval by the SA-YSSP supervisors, participants are allowed to take up to five days of leave for personal or professional reasons, potentially including the December holiday break.
  • Participants commit to the timely submission of their SA-YSSP research reports and to working towards submitting a resultant manuscript to an international scientific journal after the SA-YSSP.apply.

The SA-YSSP is organized jointly by the South African National Research Foundation, the South African Department of Science and Technology, the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and IIASA.

For more information, click here.

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